Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Niiice! Gneiss, and then some

Tangles: Gneiss, Paizel, Pearlz, plus stripes, a spiral and highlights
GNEISS - and then some

Gneiss is a tangle from Zentangle that looks like a star with aplomb. One of the things I like about it is that the original guideline disappears in the final tangle.

I'm thrilled and privileged to be attending zenAgain, a special event for CZTs (Certified Zentangle Teachers) in Newport, Rhode Island. A similar event happened some years ago and I missed it, so I promised myself that if anything like it happened again I would really try to go. One of the things I shared is some of these variations on Gneiss.

There aren't step-outs online for this tangle so you may need to seek out a nearby CZT to show you how it's done.
Tangles: Beadlines, Gneiss, Pearlz, a spiral and Auras.
MORE POINTS
Gneiss is often done with eight points. That's easy to do by simply drawing a 'sliced pie'. But you're not limited, of course. Try more points. You can do twelve by drawing two lines in each quarter instead of one.

MORE POINTS, DIFFERENTLY
You can also have more points by adding small ones in between the points of your classic Gneiss. This gives you 16 points. You can see this in the tile at the top, too.

A GNEISS COMET
Your lines needn't intersect at (more or less) the center of the star. Try an off-center center.
Put a dot somewhere in your circle and draw all your lines through there. You may want to put little ticks on the circle indicating the 1/8 divisions. Curve most of the lines, and don't forget to curve the lines of the 'V' too, as well as the second set of lines to the center.

GNEISS-LY IRREGULAR
I generally think of a 'V' as having sides of the same length, but try slanting it. This will give you uneven star sections. You can decide if you want more white or more black showing.

A GNEISS PINWHEEL
Instead of straight lines from the perimeter to the center, draw arcs. Two arcs make a sort of 'S'. You'll need to really curve the 'V' you cut out of the ends. Also curve the second set of lines to the center.
Here are two tiles showing possibilities with this pinwheel variation. In both cases I've wrapped the end of the point back into the star, such as you'd do if drawing Phicops (scroll down the post) or Aquafleur.

A GNEISS LOTUS
Instead of doing the 'V's with straight lines try doing 'bracket' lines, such as you'd do if drawing Copada.

GNEISS FILLS
Instead of the classic alternating black and white, try different fills. Here's one with white circles instead of solid black.

You can use a tangle with a lot of lines as a fill, but in that case I suggest using either black or white as a background, depending on which is not in the star. See the two tiles under 'A Gneiss Pinwheel' for example. Here are some Bijou tiles with Gneiss variations:


HAVE A GNEISS DAY!
"Starry Night" (c)2015
Tangles: Demi, Flukes, Flux, Gneiss, Pearlz

27 comments:

  1. Thank you, Margaret for another inspiring tutorial!

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  2. OMG Margaret!!! These are awesome and what a tutorial...love it!! Thank you.

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  3. I love your "and more" posts. A big thank you.

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  4. Thank you so much for sharing this "lesson". You are very generous in sharing your ideas and methods. I've learned a lot from you and am very appreciative.

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  5. Thank you so much for the gneiss study at ZenAgain! Loved it!!!

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  6. Simply brilliant, Margaret!! As always. :) All of your "and then some" posts remind me to think further, differently and unexpectedly while tangling, especially with the simpler tangles. You've helped me expand my mind, dear Margaret, and for that I'll be eternally grateful! ~hug~

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    1. It's interesting how the simpler tangles, after a while, seem sort of 'meh' but I think they are the ones most open to many variations.

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  7. Hi Margaret! Well, firstly I am rather envious that you are at ZenAgain!!! I really hope that they have another as I would love to attend the next one. Secondly, my goodness, you really are a phenomenal teacher! I love that you can display your thoughts so well in your drawings, what an amazing quality. I love when you do these "teaching sessions", and I always make sure I keep a record of your ideas for use in my personal work. Lastly, I am always amazed at the tangle ideas you come up with and your use of colour in various mediums. I really wish I could take lessons from you, but, I'm literally oceans away! Where do you get your inspiration from when you sit down to do a ZIA like your Houses? And how do you decide on the colours you are going to work with? I am just so gobsmacked by your beautiful work, and thank you for sharing it so willingly. Brenda CZT #13 South Africa - in need of a major personal Zentangle shake up!

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  8. These are fantastic Margaret. You always take a tangle to a new level.

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  9. Thank you for sharing this and for your great presentation at ZenAgain. What a magical time that was!

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    1. I would love to return in that zen bubble on occasion, as needed!

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  10. Thank you Margaret for another "and then some" tutorial on Gneiss, and for sharing this at ZenAgain! It was Gneiss to see you again!

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  11. THANK YOU SO MUCH! This post was like a good mystery novel....can't wait to scroll down and see what happens next.

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  12. So enjoyed your presentation at ZenAgain and playing with Gneiss, which is one I rarely (if ever?) touch. Inspiring!

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it Cari! Maria had suggested doing a tangle that is less 'popular', less frequently seen, so out of a few choices I ended up with Gneiss.

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  13. Gneiss is one of the early tangles that I fell in love with and have tangled several variations on. Thank you for this write up.

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    1. If you have variations I haven't included, I'd love to see them! With your permission I might update this post with more possibilities.

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  14. It was wonderful to see you at ZenAgain and work with Gneiss. You have inspired me to look at tangles in a whole new way. Thanks ever so much!

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  15. Margaret,
    I enjoyed meeting you and really enjoyed your presentation at zenAgain.
    Thank you for all the contributions made to help use "play" with patterns!

    Carmen Burgos

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  16. Thank you Margaret for this interesting and beautiful inspiring post. When I would have more money and more time I would take the first plane to come to Canada to follow some lessons!

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  17. Thank you Margaret for sharing your thoughts and artistic process! Your "and then some" posts have helped me to think "outside the box ", allowing me to create some unique artwork. You and your art are very inspiring! I'm looking forward to the day when I can travel to Saskatoon for a class with you... unless you find yourself in the sunny Okanagan, BC!! (hint,hint) :))

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  18. Beautiful work Margaret.
    Thanks for sharing with all of us. Wow am so impressed with Zentangling.

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  19. Not fabulous but fabulously gneiss! thanks for the inspiration

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  20. I thought I was creative but your creativity is unbelievable! What a great and informative post. I thank you for all the hard work preparing this. It is wonderful. Thanks, Nancy

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  21. Thanks you for the inspiration. You are a real Zen Master!

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  22. Thank you so very much for Niiice! Gneiss and then some, Margaret! You have a wonderful imagination and it is so much fun to play along with you! Have you thought of publishing an e-book with all these things in it?

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